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The Ladder Checkmate

The Ladder Checkmate

 The Ladder Checkmate Article

 Hello Chess for Children kids! Today’s topic is the 3rd installment of our series “Checkmates You Must Know”. This article and video are about the Ladder Checkmate.

The Ladder Checkmate

 The  Checkmate is a checkmate where you have 2 Rooks and your opponent has nothing. It is called the ladder mate because the Rooks move as if you were climbing a ladder. First one hand then another. One Rook cuts off a file  (or rank) then the other Rook cuts off another file (or rank).

Once you understand the plan of the Ladder it is very easy to mate your opponent.  Remember, seek to understand don’t memorize.

The Plan

Here is the plan laid out below, follow it and you will mate many many opponents.

1) Start out by deciding if you want to mate your opponent on ranks or files. Don’t choose both because it can get confusing.
2) Count how many ranks or files the opposing King has to roam. Start taking the file or ranks away from your opponent in a systematic way.
3) Be careful and pay attention to the King attacking a Rook.
4) Move away if he attacks your Rook.
5) Avoid stalemate.
If you follow these guidelines checkmate will happen very quickly.
Here is another video on the ladder checkmate.
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 The Ladder Checkmate Video

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About the author:

National Master Steve Colding
Steve Colding

Mr C. is in actual fact Life Master Stephen Colding. He has be teaching chess to children for over 40 years in the Tri- State Area. He is a co-founder of the Great Black Bear School of Chess and Founder and CEO of Chess For Children. Master Colding is also the author of  “Teach Your Child Chess in 10 Easy Lessons” and “How to Behave at the Chess-board”